Manuals

Manuals
Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router User's Guide

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Advanced Settings:
Dell™ Wireless 2350 Broadband Router User's Guide

Advanced IP Settings

DHCP Server Settings

Time Zone

Advanced Wireless

Parental Control

Advance Filtering

DNS Server Status

Dynamic DNS

Access Control Settings

Port Forwarding Settings

Static Routing

Administration Settings

 

NOTE

NOTE:

Dell technical support representatives do not support the configuration options in the Advanced Settings portion of the configuration program. These options are provided for your convenience only. However, the advanced settings are fully documented and explained in this guide.

The options Port Forwarding Settings and Static Routing are not displayed if you are in Access Point Mode.


Advanced IP Settings

The Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router comes with an assigned IP address and IP subnet mask. These settings apply only to the local network portion of the router. If you are installing the unit on an existing network or simply want to change these values, make sure the IP subnet mask is the same for all devices on your network. The network portion of the IP address must also be the same for all devices on your network.

NOTE

NOTE:

Dell strongly suggests you do not change the IP address unless there is a specific reason for doing so.

While you are changing the IP address, be aware of the following:

·         Changing the IP address of the Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router also changes the IP address pool for the DHCP server.

·         If you are using the Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router with a cable modem or DSL line, you should assign a private IP address. Private IP addresses are in one of three ranges:

·         10.0.0.1 to 10.254.254.254

·         172.16.0.1 to 172.31.254.254

·         192.168.0.1 to 192.168.254.254

·         You must use the new IP address to access the web-based configuration tool once the changes have been saved.

NOTE

NOTE:

You should only change the IP address or IP subnet mask if you are installing the Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router on an existing wired network and the DHCP server function for your Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router is disabled in the Advanced Settings. For more information, contact your network administrator.

 

Advanced IP Settings

 

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DHCP Server Settings

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), defines a way to automatically assign IP addresses to computers on a network. IP addresses are managed by a DHCP server. If a Windows computer is configured to obtain an IP address automatically, it automatically gets an address from the DHCP server.

 

DHCP Server Settings

 

Enable DHCP Server Functions

By default, the Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router is set to function as a DHCP server. If you are installing the unit on an existing network that already has a DHCP server or simply do not want the Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router to function as the network's DHCP server, click to deselect Enable DHCP Server Functions to disable the DHCP server function.

IP Address Pool Range

The IP Address Pool Range section provides a means of controlling a low and high value for the IP addresses on a network. Use the indicated fields to define the range of IP addresses you would like the Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router to provide to DHCP clients. The valid range of numbers you should enter is between 1 and 254.

The lease time is the amount of time a user will be allowed to use the IP address assigned by the DHCP server. You may specify the lease time that DHCP server offers for the client to use the IP address. This setting is especially useful on campuses or other environments where users change frequently.

IP Address Reservation

Specific IP addresses may also be reserved for particular devices in a network. The IP Address Reservation fields allow you to reserve up to 20 IP addresses for a specific system. The MAC Address field is the physical address of the network card on the client computer. Use the input fields under IP Address to indicate the IP address for those devices that should use a manually defined IP address.

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Time Zone

 

Time Zone

 

Use the Time Zone page to select your local time zone from the pull-down list. The Time Zone Settings affect the Intruder Detection Log. This setting overrides the time stamp on IP packets that are in Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).

During the summer months, the clock will move one or several hours ahead. Countries have different change dates. In most of the U.S and Canada, daylight saving time begins on the first Sunday of April. Time reverts to standard time on the last Sunday of October. To enable daylight saving click the box Enable Daylight Saving.

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Advanced Wireless

 

Advanced Wireless

 

Enable Wireless

This setting enables radio transmission and reception on the Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router.

Hide my wireless network

Checking this option disables the Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router sending out beacon packets to the wireless network. It is not selected by default and other users can easily find and make association to your Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router with the use of a site survey tool.
If you want to increase wireless network security, you can enable this feature.

Mode

The Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router is 802.11g-compatible. You can select both b & g (dual mode), or just 802.11b mode or just 802.11g mode from the Mode list.

SSID

Service Set Identifier (SSID) is a 32-character name that uniquely identifies all the computers and equipment that make up the wireless network.

Transfer Rate

Transfer rate can be set to automatic or some other fixed value. It is recommended that you set the transfer rate to automatic (Auto) to allow the wireless network devices to transmit at a rate they deem optimum at any given point of time.

Channel

The channel settings let you set the channel for this router. The radio channel is the place over which a communication transmission occurs. The operating channel number depends on the regulatory domain.

NOTE

NOTE:

If you want to configure the settings of Beacon Interval, RTS Threshold, Fragmentation Threshold, and DTIM Interval, ensure that Advanced Options is selected first.

 

Beacon Interval

The amount of time in Kusecs (one Kusec equals 1,024 microseconds) between radio beacons from the Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router to its client stations. The value range is from 1 to 65535.

RTS Threshold

This is the packet size above which the Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router will issue a Request to Send before sending the packet.

RTS (Request to Send) mechanism prevents the Hidden Node problem. When two stations are within range of the same Access Point (AP) but are not within range of each other, they are hidden nodes for each other. The packets from these two stations may collide if they arrive at the AP at the same time. To prevent data collision with the hidden node, you can activate RTS mechanism. If RTS mechanism is activated, the station will send a RTS first to inform the AP that it is going to transmit the data. Then, the AP will reply with the CTS (Clear to Send) to all stations within its range to notify all other stations and reserve the bandwidth for your data.

The RTS threshold controls what size data packet would issue a RTS. Only when the packet exceeds the RTS threshold, the device will send a RTS before sending the packet. There is trade-off to consider what value you should set for the RTS threshold. Small values cause RTS to be sent more often, and it would waste the bandwidth. However, the more often RTS packets are sent, the sooner the system can recover from collisions. It is recommended to use the default value or only minor reductions of this default value. The value range is from 1 to 2347.

Fragmentation Threshold

The fragmentation threshold, specified in bytes, determines whether data packets will be fragmented and at what size. Packets that are smaller than the specified fragmentation threshold value will not be fragmented. Packets that are larger than the fragmentation threshold will be fragmented into smaller packets and transmitted a piece at a time instead of all at once. Thus, it will reduce the need for retransmission and improve overall network performance. Fragmentation is activated usually when the system is in heavy traffic and interference environment. The setting must be within the range of 256 to 2346 bytes. It is recommended to use the default value or only minor reductions of this default value.

DTIM Interval

DTIM (Delivery Traffic Indication Message) Interval, always a multiple of the beacon period, determines how often the beacon contains a traffic indicator map (TIM). The TIM alerts stations in sleep state to stay awake long enough to receive their data frames. The value range is from 1 to 255.

CTS Protection mode

This option allows the user to enable or disable operation of '802.11g' clients in an environment where a '802.11b' AP is also broadcasting. Enabling this allows '802.11b' clients to perform better in this environment. Disabling allows maximum throughput for '802.11g' clients.

Wireless Repeater

Wireless repeater can be used to increase the coverage of your wireless network and/or to provide wired access to remote computers. You need two or more Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Routers to set up wireless repeater. The access point that is connected to the network is known as the “root AP”, the access points that extend the coverage of this root AP are known as “repeater AP’s”.

To set up wireless repeater, configure the wireless settings for all of your Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Routers to the same settings.

Configuring your router for Wireless Repeater:

  1. Click the option Enable this AP as a Wireless Repeater.

  2. Type the wireless network name (SSID) of the root AP in the SSID of root AP field.

  3. Set the “Network Encryption” mode as None, If the root AP does not provide wireless security.

  4. Set the “Network Encryption” mode as WEP, If the wireless security mode of the root AP is WEP. Then, set the proper key value, key length, key format, and default key.

  5. Click the Submit button.

 

The repeater AP must be located within the coverage of your root AP in order to associate with the root AP and extend it's coverage.

 

NOTE

NOTE:

Ensure all Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Routers are set to same wireless settings.

 

To Configure your Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router back as a root AP:

  1. Click the option Enable this AP as a Root AP

  2. Click the Submit button.

Restore Defaults

If you have customized your wireless system configuration, you can restore the wireless settings to factory defaults by clicking the Restore Defaults button.

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Parental Control

 

Parental Control

 

IP filtering is a mechanism that the Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router to accept or deny certain types of IP datagrams based on the IP address, port number, protocol type, and other criteria.

1.       Click the Add button. A pop-up Parental Control Rule window will appear.

2.       Click to select the IP address of the particular computer you want to control (for example, your child's computer) in the IP Address list.

3.       To block or grant access to the Internet during a period of time, specify the start and end time from the Time Restriction list.

4.       Click to select Allow or Deny from the Internet Access list.

5.       Enter the URL that you want to allow or deny the access in the Web Site Restrictions field.

6.       Click to select Allow or Deny access to these web sites.

7.       Enter the web keywords to deny traffic with the same keywords

8.       Click the Submit button to store the changes.

The figure above shows DNS server status. User is able to see host name, IP address, and Source.

For user hosting service with a dynamic IP from ISP’s DHCP server,  Dynamic DNS allows server to match ever changing IP to work station which the service is provided. Check “Enable Dynamic DNS” box and enter User Name, Password, and Host Name to register with Server.

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Advance Filtering

Advance Filtering

 

Advanced Filtering allows user to setup a more complicated rule to filter out unwanted traffic. Click ADD button to setup source IP, Destination IP, IP protocol, TCP port, and UDP port. Once a rule has been setup then if there is a packet that is matched with the rules then it will be either accepted or dropped by Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router depending on the rule setting.

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DNS Server Status

DNS Server Status

DNS server status shows all DNS entries known by Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router. Host name is mapped to the IP address.

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Dynamic DNS

Dynamic DNS

Users can register a domain name from dyndns.org. With this domain, it allows user enter the domain name instead of entering IP address.
DDNS will map IP address to user’s domain name.

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Access Control Settings

The Access Control Settings feature allows you to control which local client computer can or can not access the network through the router. The Dell Wireless 2350 broadband Router by default allows any local client computer to access the network. There are two tables for Access Control Settings, The Grant Access Table and the Deny Access Table. Each table is able to support up to 32 entries. Only one table can be active at a time. Selecting the checkbox for Grant Access Table will disable the Deny Access Table and vice versa.  The MAC Access control settings apply to wireless clients only and not to wired clients.

 

 

Access Control Settings

 

To enable access control in the router, perform the following steps:

1.       Click to select Enable MAC Access Control.

2.       Click the Add button, a pop-up window will open and then enter the MAC address of the network card on the computer on which you allow the access to the router.

3.       Click Submit to enter the rule to the router.

4.       To remove an existing rule, click to select edit beside MAC address.

5.       A pop-up window will open and click the Delete button to remove it.

NOTE

NOTE:

The Access Control Settings apply to wireless client computers and not to wired client computers.

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Port Forwarding Settings

 

Port Forwarding Settings
 

 

DMZ

The DMZ (demilitarized zone) feature allows access to all ports. (For example, if you have problems hosting a game server, you can choose this option. This will open all ports to your game server.)

1.       Click to select Enable DMZ Host .

2.       Type the IP address of the computer that you want to run the gaming application in the DMZ IP Address field.

3.       Click the Submit button to activate the setting.

NOTE

NOTE:

Configuring the Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router in DMZ mode is useful if you want to play certain games through the Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router but the ports cannot be opened with all other existing configuration tools.

 

NOTICE

NOTICE:

Opening a service to the Internet causes security concerns. Pay careful attention to security alerts, and make sure that strong access controls and authentication are in place before allowing access to any services.

Custom Port Forwarding Settings

Port Forwarding may be more difficult than DMZ to configure. However, it provides a relatively safe way of running an Internet application or providing an Internet service from behind a firewall since only a single port (or a range of ports) is exposed to the Internet. You can configure this port forwarding setting to create a custom rule that defines a specific port and protocol for data traffic to pass through to the specific computer on your LAN.

An example is an HTTP server running on your LAN, which you want to be available to the Internet. Your public IP address (that your ISP gives you) is X.X.X.X (The X is a number), and you have a computer hosting the HTTP server at LAN address 192.168.2.2 on your Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router (192.168.2.1) controlled LAN. You can configure 192.168.2.2 to have port forwarding for port 80 (HTTP), then users on the Internet can go to http://X.X.X.X and get the HTTP server (192.168.2.2). The data traffic entering service port 80 will be directed to the computer (192.168.2.2), and other computers on your LAN will not see this data traffic.

For some Internet applications (such as Internet messaging and gaming applications), you can configure this port forwarding setting so that these applications can function correctly behind the firewall. These applications are required to have specific TCP/UDP ports. The ports for these applications and the protocol type will depend on what Internet services you are using. Check with your service provider or application's user manual to have the information first.

Make sure you have the following ports set up as described below.

1.       Click the ADD button first to add entries.

2.       Enter the desired name or description in the Service Name field.

3.       In the Incoming Ports field, enter a range of ports. If you want to specify only a single port number, enter the same number in both fields.

4.       In the Destination IP Address field, enter the IP address of the computer you want to receive the connection request.

5.       In the Destination Port field, enter a port number or a range of ports of the machine to which you are mapping.

7.       In the Port type field, select TCP, UDP, or both protocols. The protocol could be specified in your application's documentation.

8.       Click the Submit button to activate the setting.

For example, if you want to play the game Fighter Ace II on a computer with an IP address of 192.168.2.3, enter 3 for the Destination IP Address. Select TCP as the Port type. Enter 50000 and 51000 for two fields of Incoming Ports and also for the Destination Port. Click Submit button to activate the setting. For other games or services, consult the application's user manual.

Commonly Used Ports

Services

Protocol Type

Ports

HTTP (WEB Server)

TCP

80

FTP

TCP

20, 21

TELNET

TCP

23

SMTP (Mail Server)

TCP

25

POP3 (Mail Server)

TCP

110

IRC

TCP

6667

NNTP (News Server)

TCP

119

Port Triggering

Port triggering allows the router to watch outgoing data for a specific port number. The IP address of the computer that sends the data is remembered by the router, so that when the requested data returns through the router, the data will be passed to the specific computer by way of IP address and port mapping rules. The router opens the port when the Port Triggering happens. When the computer running the application stops sending the data through this port, the router will close the port.

1.       Click the PORT TRIGGERING button first.

2.       Enter the desired name or description in the Application Name field.

3.       In the Trigger Port field, enter a port number. Check with your Internet application provider for more information on what Trigger Port it is using.

4.       Select TCP (Transmission Control Protocol), or UDP (User Datagram Protocol), or both protocols as the Trigger Port Type.

5.       Specify the range of the Public Ports by typing the start and end port numbers in the required fields.

6.       Select TCP (Transmission Control Protocol), or UDP (User Datagram Protocol), or both (TCP and UDP) as the Public Port Type.

7.       Click the Submit button to activate the setting.

Click the Submit button to store the changes.

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Static Routing

 

Static Routing

 

Static routes are manually configured routes to remote networks. That is, the route is predefined and is not discovered by the Routing Information Protocol (RIP), as in dynamic routing. Static routing allows you to assign a gateway to an IP address or network. If there are routers on your internal network that do not function with RIP 1 or 2, you can set up a static route to those routers.

The advantage to using static routing is that network traffic is reduced; thus, static routing is beneficial for slow Internet connections. Routing using static routes is practical for small networks. For larger networks, the router needs to dynamically keep track of changes in the physical wiring of the network, and the use of dynamic routing (RIP) is recommended.

NOTICE

NOTICE:

The Static Routing settings are intended for advanced network administrators only. Do not change these settings unless you are certain of the correct values. You may not be able to access the configuration tool if invalid information is entered.

To use static routing, manually add the Destination IP Address, Subnet Mask, and Gateway IP Address for each route you are adding to the Static Routing Table, and click Add. Then click Submit. If you are routing to an entire network, the last number in the destination IP address should be a zero (0); for example, 192.168.0.0.

NOTE

NOTE:

In static routing, the Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router does NOT dynamically discover routing information and does NOT use RIP. The Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router currently does NOT support RIP.

Use the fields beside each route and the Delete button to remove static routes from the Static Routing Table.

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Administration Settings

Password Settings

The Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router uses a password to authenticate the user before allowing changes to be made to any network settings. If you would like to change the current password, click to select Change Your Password and enter the new password in both New Password and Retype Password fields. Write down the password and keep it in a secure location for future reference.

System Administration

·         HTTP Port No.
Do not change the HTTP Port value unless you have reason to do so. Typically, web servers listen for incoming web requests on port 80.

·         Allow remote user to configure the device
If you would like a remote user to be able to administer your Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router over the Internet, click to select titled Allow remote user to configure the device. Enter the IP address for the remote administration host computer.

·         Allow remote user to ping the device
Click to select Allow remote user to ping the device to enable your Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router  to be pinged by any user on the Internet. This feature is helpful if you want to allow other Internet users to check the status of your Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router.

·         Enable UPnP function UPnP stands for Universal Plug and Play, a protocol which allows UPnP-enabled client computers, such as Windows XP, to discover and configure the Dell Wireless 2350 Broadband Router. One of most common use of UPnP on the router is to open ports to allow application-specific data to be forwarded through the router for various Internet services or gaming applications. The router detection and the router configuration process can be carried out automatically by the UPnP-enabled client applications such as MSN Messenger so you won't have to do it manually. Click to select Enable UPnP function to enable this service.

If you have an Windows XP system, you can use it to access and control the router while the router's UPnP function is enabled. Here are some examples of what you can do with UPnP from your Windows XP system.

Example 1: Access the router's web configuration tool without knowing its IP address.

1.       Double-click the My Network Neighborhood icon from the desktop.

2.       Double-click the Broadband Router icon that is created for your router.
This will bring up the authentication screen of the router's Web configuration tool.

3.       Type the correct password and click the OK button to access the web configuration tool.

Authentication Screen
Authentication Screen

 

Example 2: Manage the router's port forwarding rules from the Windows XP interface.

NOTE

NOTE:

If you have already configured a port forwarding rule for the service through the web configuration tool, you don't need to perform the following steps for the same service again.

 

4.       Right-click the My Network Neighborhood icon on the desktop.

5.       Right-click the Internet Connection icon created for the router.

 

Network Connections
Network Connections

 

6.       Right-click the icon and left-click Properties.

7.       Click Settings.

8.       Click Add.

9.       Type Description of service, IP address of the service host, External Port number for this service, Internal Port number for this service, and click to select either TCP or UDP. For example, the graph below shows an example of how to enable a computer with an IP address 192.168.2.101 to host a public HTTP server.

 

Service Settings
Service Settings

 

10.   Click the OK button to save the changes.

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